young filmmakers

Tuscany

Spoiler alert: this film has not been shot in Tuscany, does not pretend to be Tuscany and does not involve anything remotely Italian. But it is oh so ‘Tuscany’!

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Our amazingly inventive interview was sent to Geoff, wirter and director of this lovely masterpiece and here’s what he sent back to us:

If of all your superpowers you could only keep one - which one would it be?
My superpower might be the fact that I trained and work as an actor, so I feel I know how to direct an actor in a way which they can readily respond to, as I would.
But this sounds a bit boring and ‘directory’ so instead I’ll say my superpower to keep is, (having worked in a wine shop for many years), that I always know what we should drink at any point of the day.

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
I feel like a film is such a total expression of an initial idea, then a script, then a shoot, then a post, a whole process, made up by so many peoples' efforts and expertise and expression, all seamlessly assimilated into one simple linear thing. And this is such a joy; so many things happening at once, within one thing, every time you watch it. Then the feeling of sharing a film, that whole one big expression of so many people, telling a story, discussing and provoking ideas and subjects in the world, evoking emotions and laughter in an audience; that feeling of hearing an audience enjoying a film you’ve made, or helped make in some way… Well there’s nothing like it, and no difficulty in the process or journey could stand up against that end feeling.

Why this film?
This film idea arrived one morning, while on the phone to a good friend. I thought about my girlfriend, and how she once reckoned that if she proposed to me before I proposed to her, that I would be livid with her, for taking the ‘male tradition’ away. But then of course these (more equal) days, why shouldn’t a woman propose to a man, just the same?
Then later I was crossing the river on a bus and I thought how the couple could be there on the bans of the over, clearing plastic, and how that would encapsulate something global and yet domestic and faintly romantic and epic and small and with the Nation’s capital as an accidental background, all at once. The final film is a mixture of comedy, romance, feminist progression and male concession/ education.

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want…
Some kind of huge historical adventure thriller, based on a never before told true story, but also has a subtle yet effective social improvement message, something which inspires people to help each other, and the film is funny, and takes place in many countries, and is genre defining yet classic. It's shot by Janusz Kaminski and stars Ben Wishaw, Natalie Portman, Cate Blanchett, Gary Oldman, Amit Shah, Penelope Cruz, Adam Godley, Chris Cooper, Kevin Spacey, Jonny Depp and Jonelle Monae!

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
I do truly want to make films which will move people so emotionally, that it changes the way they behave in their lives. I would be very happy and honoured if I could count myself as a front-runner contributor to restrengthening and developing the British Film industry one day. To get to the stage where I get to think “what shall I make a film about next year, or rather, what SHOULD I make a film about next year?”
I would love people to wonder when they see a film of mine, what will this one be like, and to come away from it, thinking how different it was to the last one.

Any Instagram, Twitter or websites where your future fans can stalk you?
I have a website at
www.geoffreybreton.com

my instagram is
@geoffrey_breton

Geoff Breton

Geoff Breton

So now you know more! To see Tuscany hop on your preferable means of transportation and come on down to Streatham Space Project 10.9.2019 at 19.00.
Get your tickets HERE.

Hunting

There’s different levels of grieving. And Hunting deals with ones on the top of the scale. And manages to find the key to it as well. Quite literally.

And because we think you are special and deserve double the fun we’ve got a double interview. With Katie the producer and Jack the director.

There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
Katie: Has anyone seen this person? She might be hiding in a cupboard somewhere surrounded by budgets.
Jack: If I was selling something I imagine it would be rather boring — a bank account or washing up liquid — something disappointing sensible. I just hope I got paid well...

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
K: The difficulty is the organisation of all the 'small things' that often get overlooked - the getting kit from a kit house to a location and where to store it and who will drive it etc as an example - there are always small things that can easily turn out to be big things if you let them be but the worthwhile thing about this crazy world of filmmaking is that it's a puzzle with thousands of pieces and the moment it all comes together and everyone is smiling - you know you have done your job well.
J: I think it’s something to do with a film being a collection of other works of art — some larger than the film — the music composition, the architecture and design of the art department, the writer, the actors, the photography of the DoP. I’m drawn to the curation of other people’s brilliance. I love that it’s collaborative: maybe that shared endeavour is what makes the difficult moments both easier (a team alongside you) and worth it.

Why this film?
K: It was the twist that got me, I felt really intrigued by the script which was brilliant and felt flipped by the ending - I knew it was going to be a great one to make. Jack is a brilliant Director so it was a great one to help bring to life for him.
J:
I was flat-hunting and it struck me how invasive looking around a property is: how vulnerable the person living there, but out at the time, is. How a simple estate agents viewing could be manipulated by someone to darker ends. Plus it wasn’t too big a challenge to take on for my first film: two people, one location, performance driven.

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want...
K: Constraints are what makes a film - that's where the passion lies. You get the real determination come out when you have hurdles to climb. That said though, developing a TV series such as The Affair would be a dream.
J: I’m not sure I’d want to work without constraints — for me restrictions (budget, time, my ideas) seem to help foster my creativity. But I’d love to adapt a sweeping multi-generation novel (see my answer to question 2 — other people’s art)

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
K: To continue to produce exciting content that moves people. I'm working towards my first feature and have written a pilot for a TV series which has been an ongoing project of mine.
J: To keep directing alongside my work as an actor. To take on new challenges and explore new genres and mediums.

Any Instagram, Twitter or websites where your future fans can stalk you?
K: @huntingfilm
J: @mrjackhawkins and @likeahawkfilms

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Hunting - with all of its’ twists and turns - will be screened July 9th at 19.30 at the Streatham Space Project. Be there or be somehwere else.
Tickets, as usual, HERE.

Bingo Ladies

Ever wished you were a fly on the wall in a ladies’ bathroom? Well, we hope not as that’s called being a pervert.
On the other hand eavesdropping on a gang of elderly ladies playing bingo is quite a natural urge. And in this film you get to see that ladies don’t get old. They get refined.

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Merve Erde, producer and co-writer of this gem, answered our questionare. And away we go:

Tere is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
It says: "A story without headline".

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
As a small creative production company, it is very challenging to get clients to survive as a filmmaker. It is also quite hard to get exposure and recognition for the work we do. However, the magic and necessity of filmmaking goes beyond those limitations and hardships. It gives you the possibility to take a feeling, an idea or an image to different realm where you can narrate, represent or manipulate them as you wish. It allows you to communicate your story and share it with the world in the most charming and direct form. Depending on the stylistic and intellectual approach, you can tell the same story in many different ways and each element (light, camera, script, sound etc) contributes to it differently to form a uniformed body. The whole creative process of filmmaking makes it very worthwhile. It is also a collective form of art which brings creative people together to create a unique piece of art.

Why this film?
Our production company, That Thing, had an office next to a bingo hall at the time. Irina was quite amazed by the elderly ladies who went there very regularly. They all had a particular style, a particular attitude. Bingo was more than a game for them - it allowed them to socialize, make friends and enjoy their time. In a city like London, where everything is quite frenetic and organized around youth culture, we thought that bingo halls opened up an alternative space for these women. We can discuss how satisfying of an experience this is for them, or whether it is positive or negative. However, we wanted to get to know them and their stories better. On the other hand, we did not want to romanticize it so we introduced some absurd moments in it and tried to blur the line between "fiction" and "factual" in their narratives.

Another aspect that we were interested in was to make these women "protagonists" of our film. Elderly women have a very limited range of roles in film and these roles are generally repetitive and stereotypical. We wanted to challenge this as well.

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want...
We like dark comedies and the sense of absurdity/ridiculousness that arises in unexpected tragic moments. It would be probably such a story. With Vincent Gallo playing the main character.

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
We have some short film projects. We are also working on a series of video portraits such as the bingo ladies.  The next one we will take place in a hair salon in Brixton.

Merve Erde

Merve Erde

To see what the Bingo Ladies have to say - and boy do they like to talk - come on down to the good ole’ Streatham Space Project 9th July at 19.30 and just so you make sure you get your seat you might as well buy a ticket right now. Right HERE.

The Fourth Trimester

The Third film in our Sisters Of The Silver Screen CineShots is about the greatest power of women - the power to give life. Which can quite often turn into a burden no one really talks about.

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Phoebe McCaughley is the single mother of this beautiful project. Here’s what she had to say about giving birth to this film:

There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
She likes to move it: Phoebe McCaughley an animation graduate who tells stories through her hands.

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
I believe that Stop Motion; the type of film making I use is pretty high up there on the unpleasant scale. The nature of the medium means I have to be stuck in a dark room for hours on end contorting my body into uncomfortable repetitive positions to bring these puppets to life at a ridiculously slow pace. The puppets I create from their beginnings of wire skeletons then go on to come to life on screen with their own personalities, it is the most magical and satisfying feeling.

Why this film?
The birth of babies is often portrayed on television, but there’s very little about how difficult looking after a new-born can be for many parents. Through interviews and research I found the topic to be taboo, because you’re immediately supposed to have a love for your baby that is incomparable to anything else. This is not always the case. I sought to communicate the reality of the struggle that many new parents face and open a conversation to challenge the mainstream portrayal of childbirth. I thought that the medium of stop motion film would be suited to a subject which requires empathy as the technique requires care and human touch. Though touching on a sensitive and serious topic, elements of humour in the film make it more relatable and uplifting. I often reverse the roles of mother and baby to communicate feelings of vulnerability.

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want…
I would love to make a comical horror film; I’m very inspired by the work of Lee Hardcastle. In terms of cast, I think I would always like to stick to the miniature lifeless puppet type but if I were to pick voice actors, that would be a privilege as I often have to convince my boyfriend to turn himself into any given character. I think Michaela Coel and David Tennant would be great in a Horror animation.

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
I’m not too sure on what specifically I’d like to do yet as I have enjoyed switching between roles of maker, mover and director. I hope that my creativity continues to grow in whatever role I take next. I enjoy telling stories which reflect the details of life that are often overlooked.

Any Instagram, Twitter or websites where your future fans can stalk you?
My Instagram is @phoebestopmotion
My Website is
www.phoebemcc.co.uk

Phoebe McCaughley

Phoebe McCaughley

The Fourth Simester will be screened, along with five other female-made short films, 9.7. at 19.30 at the Streatham Space Project.
Make sure you get your tickets right over HERE.

Bath

Can one word ruin a holiday? Can it ruin a relationship? Or can it build one?
So little words, so many questions!

Bath is written and directed by Meredith Dobbs whom we are more than delighted to host for the second time at CineShots. And she never manages to let us down. Meredith, take it away.

There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
Maybe an interview about a film I've made? But an advertisement? I don't know what it would be for.

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
I just genuinely love working with actors and a team of filmmakers. If I'm going to anything worthwhile worth my time, it will always be this.

Why this film?
I wanted to tell a story about invisible queerness and how hard it can be to stand up and say, "I want this invisible thing to be seen." I was trying to work out how a loving partner could be the antagonist that, to create the central conflict in my film, and I thought about how politics can affect our intimate relationships negatively. So invisible queerness and politics in relationships became the central themes, and I think both are quite topical and relatable.

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want...
Casting would depend on the project, but I'd definitely want to work with actors I get along with really well. I think that's especially important for improv, because the method requires the director and actor to ask a lot of each other. As for the unlimited budget, I'd use it to make sure everyone on set was paid fairly, had reasonable working hours, childcare on set, long enough breaks between shifts, etc. And after that we can talk about crane shots and expensive GFX.

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
I want to write and direct narrative features. And probably edit them, too. I'd also like to edit features directed by others because I do really love editing.

Meredith Dobbs

Meredith Dobbs

We won’t tell you much about the film but let’s just say there’a a lot at stake here. And you’ll just have to pop down to the ol’ Streatham Space Project on 11.6. at 19.30 to see how it all unrolls.
Tickets right HERE.

"Have You Seen Buster?"

If CineShots was a Scooby Doo cartoon Emmanuel Li and his gang would be a bunch of meddling kids and we, the old guys, would always be angry at them for showing everyone we’re just a bunch of pretenders.
And that’s because the guys behind The Big Tent Films know their ropes pretty well.

We interogated Emmanuel Lie - writer and director of Have You Seen Buster? - in a haunted castle right after his Mistery Machine van broke down.

There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
It'd be a very unflattering photo of me followed by "MISSING: Have You Seen Emmanuel Li? Last Seen in the Walthamstow Marshes."

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
Film is such a unique and fantastic art form in its accessibility and ability to appeal to absolutely everyone. I've always had a passion for stories and to be able to have the creative control and freedom to bring a story to life from script to screen is intensely rewarding. The process is, of course, arduous and often frustrating, be it writer's block or on-set complications, but filmmaking being the ultimate team sport, working with so many talented people, sharing in these ups and downs, solving problems together, all while striving to tell a great story will never cease to spark joy in me. And hopefully, when all is said and done, it will spark joy in the audience as well.

Why this film?
Having just come off making a bleak, gritty drama last summer, with many more dark comedies in the works, I wanted to take a departure and make something sweet and charming without any cynicism. I love dogs but have never had one, so part of the "searching-for-a-dog" plot came from that. The location also played a big part - exploring Walthamstow Village made me think of all the wacky characters that could inhabit such a colourful, vibrant world, a world I desperately wanted to share with audiences. Being a magician, I love twists and I won't spoil it here, but the ending came from something that happened that was really close to me, which was the main inspiration for the film.

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want...
Wow, what an opportunity! I'd make a darkly comedic Neo-Western crime caper - think Reservoir Dogs with a Coen Brothers twist. It'd be set in harsh, urban LA and then transition to the gorgeous, sunswept backdrop of the Mojave Desert and hell, the Grand Canyon while we're at it! It'd follow a ragtag bunch of criminals who made off with the wrong suitcase containing something seemingly worthless but are now hunted by rival gangs, a corrupt detective with a crossbow, and a female assassin whose preferred method of transport is horseback. It'd star Taron Egerton, Daniel Kaluuya, Dean Norris, Timothee Chalamet, Joaquin Phoenix, and Charlize Theron. It's a crazy, chaotic wild ride and maybe even a bit messy and trashy, but among the madness, I'd love to explore what drives people to commit crime and the complex disparity between generations through the father-sons relationship of the main group.

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
My dream would be to continue doing what I love - filmmaking and storytelling - for the rest of my life and be lucky enough to make a living out of it. There's nothing quite like the collective sharing of a story through film, and to be able to provide that experience and create art that makes the drudgery of life that much more bearable would be an honour.

Emmanuel Li

Emmanuel Li

To see if anyone’s seen Buster you’ll have to pop to Streatham Space Project 11.6. at 19.30 and watch the film with five other amazing shorts. Emmanuel will also be there for Q&A and your regular autographs.
Make sure you get your TICKETS.

The Trouble With Retirement

Watching a film about two old buddies tha just got retired doesn’t sound too exciting, really. Knowing one of those guys is a retired assassin, well, we’re stirring things up a bit. Realizing they’re both retired assassins. Now we’re in trouble.

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An interesting film requires an interesting idea. Surely an interesting idea requires an interesting filmmaker…
Here’s Charlie Lilly:

There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
A young upcoming writer/director, Charlie Lilly, uses his love for genre cinema to talk about his generation in his new feature film.

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
I have often heard directors and producers refer to the filmmaking process as high level problem solving and I couldn’t agree more. No matter how much you plan or prepare for a shoot things will always go wrong, but actually sometimes things going awry on set can be a blessing in disguise; having to think up a quick solution on your feet often leads to a new idea that is better than the original one. Sometimes what you thought was going to be your masterpiece turns into a rough draft so bad it makes you physically ill, and you think all the long hours spent shooting have been a waste. What makes filmmaking magical to me is to then bring creativity and new ideas and turn what at first appears like an irredeemable mess into something you’re not only proud of, but has even exceeded what you’d first imagined.

Why this film?
I’ve always liked the idea of normalising larger than life jobs that people might have. The concept behind this short comes from a simple question; what happens to a hitman when he retires? Does he still get leaving cards, and drinks at the pub? The film starts with a working class hitman retiring and taking his friend for some drinks in the pub before going on holiday with his wife. It’s a comedy-crime that doesn’t want to be a parody – it follows the visual tropes and beats of a crime genre film. Although there’s plenty of humour and over the top violence, the film also has emotional moments – my hope is for the audience to feel like the characters are real, relatable people.

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want... 
My dream project would be to make a British hangout movie like Dazed and Confused where the audience gets to know and love the characters, to then bring in an unexpected horror element half way through. Too often characters in horror feel like cannon fodder, eliminating the tension and the drama from the killing – I want the audience to be genuinely terrified because they don’t want to see the characters they’ve grown attached to getting picked off one by one. I envision it as Richard Linklater meets From Dusk Till Dawn but (the threat being something a little more grounded than an army of vampires). I think that would be a truly terrifying experience. I’d like to cast young, British actors such as Will Poulter, John Boyega and Letitia Wright who are naturally likable and charming but have shown extreme flexibility when it comes down to acting, excelling in different genres and styles.

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
My future goal regarding filmmaking is to start making features. I want to one day be seen as the director who brought the public’s eye back to Britain and its culture, hopefully starting a new wave of big budget original British storytelling. European and British cinema has an enormous pool of talent for films that too often is relegated to small releases. In the past, films such as Babylon, The Long Good Friday and Alfie brought British culture of their time into the mainstream - but I feel like there’s been a gap since then and my generation has been mostly represented in American films, which while great can’t represent exactly the same experience as my own.

Charlie Lilly

Charlie Lilly

The Trouble Wiht Retirement will be screened in all its’ glory on the Streatham Space Project’s big screen 11.6. at 19.30. Well, that’s when the door opens, the screenings will start at 20.00 so you have a time for a quick pint.
Tickets HERE so you won’t be left standing outside. (They’re also available on the door but they’re a quid cheaper online. Just sayin’)

The Drive

How does one talk about memories when the memory starts dissolving?
There’s films about father-son relationships and there’s films that make you want to call your parents and tell them how much you love them. Guess which one is The Drive.

Adam Thomas Wright is much younger than he should be to create a film such as The Drive and we’re always amazed by the talent and will of the new filmmaking generation.

There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
Adam Thomas Wright: Starring in Mr Potato Head biopic

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
Yeah, filmmaking can be very challenging. Take, for example, the sheer unpredictability of it. On The Drive, the weather really influenced the project in a bad way. When you are on a shoestring budget, you've got to plan properly with stringent time restraints on kit hire etc. And when Mother Nature comes along and throws it awry, it can be hard. But each challenge is an experience to learn from. Everything gets a little easier after each challenge you face. And that's worth it.

Why this film?
I was actually sitting in a car, driving down a country road late at night. I thought about how cool it would be to have a series of shots using the repitition of street lights and road markings. Then I thought about the type of conversations people have late at night on a long journey. I have had experience of dementia in my family, and I thought it was a topic worth discussing and perhaps be able to find some light in such a difficult situation.

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want...
Some kind of surreal twist on reality; I love films that take real life and make it even more uncomfortable. I like the idea of making audiences really feel something indescribable. There are so many talented actors out there, but John Malkovich and Paul Dano are personal favourites, and Elsie Fisher was a delight in Eighth Grade this year.

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
I am writing a new script at the moment for a new short. It's a bit different in theme, but I've learnt lessons from The Drive. 

Adam Thomas Wright

Adam Thomas Wright

The Drive will be screened 11.6. with Adam as our guest for the Q&A.
Tickets are available HERE and they will open the door for you at 19:30 at the usual Streatham Space Project.

Short Straw

Short films tend to surprise us with a nice twist at the end. Some do it good, some do it better. And some make us think ‘hmm, there might actually be a feature film somewhere in there…’

Ricky J Payne is as South Londoner as one can get. Born and bred in Brixton he is a perfect example of a healthy ‘let’s make some films!’ filmmaker. Here’s how he answered our questions.

There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
Lets play to find the story, and when we have found it, be unrelenting in its detail.

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
Seeing the story come to life;  taking a shape through the love and craft of the cast and crew. Seeing it, sat down beside audiences (especially when they don't know me). Seeing their reactions whatever they are. (Though it made me tear up when the audience in L.A. laughed at my comedy RIGHTSWIPE.  Seeing an audience understand what you're are conveying, is one of the best feelings ever). Then after that, is the understanding what worked and what didn't.Then taking that and pushing my love and craft in story telling further. 

Why this film?
Opportunity combined with pre production planning on a larger project called SEED. 'Short' Version, a test a film for that larger project which has now it's own bigger story which we plan to do separate from SEED.  I was filming with Director of Photography Diogo Atadini and Producer Victor Rios on another shoot, and then after, we were dropping off the equipment at Diogo's old studio.  I was inspired by the industrial elevator leading to it. I said to Victor, "We need to use this before Diogo moves out!" 
So I went away, sat down , thought about the elevator and the type of characters or situations it could give me and at the same time, I remember discussing about mobile film festivals and competitions. Opportunity to kill two birds with one stone.  1. Get my feet back into making scifi which I love and 2, test myself and the others who would join me, on using a mobile phone as the camera. After lots of Jammy Dodgers and Tea and great work from the cast and crew, Short Straw was born. 

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want...
One of my dream projects is an anthology scifi stories in the vein of  X-Files / The Expanse / Night Flyers , Men in Black and Cloverfield.  Using not just narrative, but also dance, music, paint, stop motion and practical effects. Practical Effects is a major thing or next step for me. I want to do a scifi film with majority of effects in camera, and three of the first major projects in that anthology has been drafted, however, funding is required to make them work. 

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
I have five immediate goals  which are scheduled throughout this year. SEED, STALKER,  Faye Ray VMA Dance Season 2, SNAKES (Working Title) and RIGHTSWIPE. SEED is one of the official scifi stories of the anthology mentioned above. SEED requires a built set , a studio to film in and moments of stop motion. I don't want to do it run and gun, that  wouldn't work for the vision I have for it.  Where SHORTSTRAW shows what we can do run and gun,  SEED's purpose is a next step to show what I can do with modest funding on a 'scifi' short film within a studio format, and give an idea of the the production value / style I want to achieve for the rest of the  scifi stories that will follow that.  STALKER I cannot discuss at the moment, however more news will follow once we begin festival submissions next month .  Faye Ray VMA Season 2 is a series of dance videos in collaboration with Faye Reader, who is dancer, choreographer and poet. Our first season ,  A Time to Play, which is really us getting to know each other in reccee sessions is out now on Vimeo, Youtube and Instagram.  Snakes (Working Title) is a Cyber Punk short film I'm developing and will be working with actor / fellow filmmaker Billie Vee. Rightswipe is a non-romantic comedy of the challenges with online dating, and shows my love for directing awkward / dark comedy.  Currently touring Festivals, and thanks to an amazing cast & crew,  has achieved Best International Film LA Short Film Festival and Best Comedy at London Independent Awards. I want to expand on it with Writers and Producers Max Warrick and Carina Birrell and we're currently in talks to do so. Scifi , Fantasy and Arkward / Dark Comedy is my love and direction for the next 10 years.

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So come on down to Streatham Space Project this Tuesday, 14.5. at 19.30 and watch Short Straw among five other shorts and have a chat with Ricky!
Tickets here!

Jo and Jade

Teenage love is a serious thing.
Seriously.
Especially if told through an amazing story directed by an even more amazing teenage director (we demand an ID as we don’t really believe he’s that young) Ethan Ross.

We’ve had a quick e-chat with Ethan and threw our usual set of questions at him. Here’s what we got back:

There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
I think were it a photo of me, it'd be something like “A young director from north london making waves in indie film community" or something like that - nothing too show-offy!
Were it for Jo and Jade (the short film), it'd be "fresh and subversive lgbt romcom makes a splash, despite its young team". I'd be  much keener to promote the film than myself!

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
Although it's a difficult process, I really couldn't stand not creating - it's like my sustenance, and at this point I find it boring to relax... I prefer to be working on a script, or fine tuning some cutting! I absolutely love the feeling of having made something I really feel is my own, that I'm proud of, and that I'm happy to show to people. Along with the camaraderie of the shoot, that feeling really makes it worth it.

Why this film?
In terms of modern cinema, i feel the simple teen movie is a bit underrepresented in the mainstream, as opposed to the 80s where you had people like John Hughes making those amazing films we all love. I wanted to make something honest, in the way it presented characters and situations, and in the way that, well, those classic films tend to have very idealistic happy endings, and I felt that wasn't really very truthful to actual teenage life.

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want...
I'd really love to make a musical, so probably that - but definitely set in London, I feel like there aren't enough musicals properly set here. I'd want to cast Saoirse Ronan and John Goodman because they're both amazing and would have pretty great chemistry. I'm tearing up just at the idea.

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
Ultimately, I'd like to make films full-time, with nothing else on the side, preferably as a director, but if not, probably as an editor. In the shorter term, I'd like to get my work into some festivals where people can really see my work, but that's not the most important thing. The dream for me is just to improve as much as possible, and to make something I'm unfalteringly proud of. That'd be great.

Ethan Ross

Ethan Ross

Jo and Jade will be screened at May’s CineShots on 14.5.2019.
Tickets available HERE and don’t forget to bring everyone you know.