sisters of the silver screen

I am Sherlock Holmes

You should not let the title decieve you. Except in this case.
Or should you? The answer might not be as elementary.

Sherice Griffiths wrote, directed and produced - yes, women are indeed the only human beings capable of multitasking - I am Sherlock Holmes and here’s how she answere our questionare.

There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
Film director accidentally films the wrong movie!
Due to a mix up in the production office two scripts became one when the latest James Bond movie script was printed alongside Sharknado VII. Indie director turned Hollywood director, Sherice Griffiths, pens the strange mashup movie to be the next big thing, ‘Shark-en not stirred!’

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
This is a great question, because you’re right, it is incredibly difficult to make a film. What makes it worthwhile for me is getting to meet so many incredibly talented and creative people whilst doing it. I love the collaborative element of filmmaking and a lot of my closest friends I’ve made on filmsets. I really love working with actors and hearing the words on a page come to life. When you do finally get into the edit and see everyone's hard work come together you get a huge sense of accomplishment.

Why this film?
I love films that have a twist. I’m a big Christopher Nolan fan and at the time of writing ‘I am Sherlock Holmes’ I had recently re-watched Memento and wanted to look at ways to tell a story differently. The theme of mental health awareness is something that just seemed to fit the story and it’s a subject matter that I am very passionate about.

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want..
This is a tough one, it would probably be either be an action film with lots of martial arts and stunts or a fantasy film where anything was possible. In terms of casting there's a lot of actors I would love to work with, Leonardo DiCaprio, Sally Hawkins, Ian McKellen and Anne Hathaway. If they were all in a film together I've no doubt it would be an amazing (somewhat strange) film.

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
At the moment my short term goal is to realise my next short film project, a short sci-fi drama that I’m currently developing. Long term I’m hoping that I can move into directing television or narrative features. 

Any Instagram, Twitter or websites where your future fans can stalk you?
Twitter: Sherice_g
Insta: Sherice.g
Facebook:
www.facebook.com/daredynamicproductions

Sherice Griffiths

Sherice Griffiths

To see this amazing twisty short and speak to Sherice in person come to Streatham Space Project July 9th at 19.30.
And just to make sure you get your seat maybe check for tickets HERE.

Bingo Ladies

Ever wished you were a fly on the wall in a ladies’ bathroom? Well, we hope not as that’s called being a pervert.
On the other hand eavesdropping on a gang of elderly ladies playing bingo is quite a natural urge. And in this film you get to see that ladies don’t get old. They get refined.

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Merve Erde, producer and co-writer of this gem, answered our questionare. And away we go:

Tere is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
It says: "A story without headline".

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
As a small creative production company, it is very challenging to get clients to survive as a filmmaker. It is also quite hard to get exposure and recognition for the work we do. However, the magic and necessity of filmmaking goes beyond those limitations and hardships. It gives you the possibility to take a feeling, an idea or an image to different realm where you can narrate, represent or manipulate them as you wish. It allows you to communicate your story and share it with the world in the most charming and direct form. Depending on the stylistic and intellectual approach, you can tell the same story in many different ways and each element (light, camera, script, sound etc) contributes to it differently to form a uniformed body. The whole creative process of filmmaking makes it very worthwhile. It is also a collective form of art which brings creative people together to create a unique piece of art.

Why this film?
Our production company, That Thing, had an office next to a bingo hall at the time. Irina was quite amazed by the elderly ladies who went there very regularly. They all had a particular style, a particular attitude. Bingo was more than a game for them - it allowed them to socialize, make friends and enjoy their time. In a city like London, where everything is quite frenetic and organized around youth culture, we thought that bingo halls opened up an alternative space for these women. We can discuss how satisfying of an experience this is for them, or whether it is positive or negative. However, we wanted to get to know them and their stories better. On the other hand, we did not want to romanticize it so we introduced some absurd moments in it and tried to blur the line between "fiction" and "factual" in their narratives.

Another aspect that we were interested in was to make these women "protagonists" of our film. Elderly women have a very limited range of roles in film and these roles are generally repetitive and stereotypical. We wanted to challenge this as well.

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want...
We like dark comedies and the sense of absurdity/ridiculousness that arises in unexpected tragic moments. It would be probably such a story. With Vincent Gallo playing the main character.

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
We have some short film projects. We are also working on a series of video portraits such as the bingo ladies.  The next one we will take place in a hair salon in Brixton.

Merve Erde

Merve Erde

To see what the Bingo Ladies have to say - and boy do they like to talk - come on down to the good ole’ Streatham Space Project 9th July at 19.30 and just so you make sure you get your seat you might as well buy a ticket right now. Right HERE.

Leak

It doesn’t happen often that we come across a film which is so very raw and so explicit and so directly on point that we simply cannot pass it.
Leak is all of the above.

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Lead is a film about periods and vaginas and it’s about bloody time someone made it. It took four breasts, two vaginas and one camera to make this film and they all belong to Charlie and Rubina. Take it away ladies.

There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
Badass females trying to close the gender pay gap, end violence against minorities and make content that can empower and enlighten.

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work film making is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
Being able to tell stories we've never heard before and having no shame in raising our own voices. By day we both work for big TV companies and our side hustles - like making our podcast DAS and indie films like this - allow us to let loose after a lot of graft working for the man. When we're together we are the boss, its freeing to only have to answer to ourselves.

Why this film?
Periods are something we both had a lot of shame about. We could never quite vocalise where that came from or how to move past it. We wanted to explore our feelings about menstruation the good, the bad, the bloody. Being on a very small budget meant we had to be experimental, the two of us did every role on and off screen. It was important to us to make something completely self-sufficient. LEAK allowed us to be messy and dirty and gross. That process taught us all those things are absolutely fine and natural, we hope that's what people take away from watching this film.

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want...
We'd make a feature archive drama doc about the Spice Girls. We were teenagers in their heyday and 90's culture has definitely shaped our feminism and our politics. It's where we've come from. It would be very satisfying to critically analyse and pay homage to that time in our history.

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
We'd just like to keep making stuff and keep getting better. Everything we do we're learning and working together means we have someone else to keep the other going. The journey is as exciting as the end product. We love making films, its exciting to think about whats next and where we could go. We are both very excited about trying new things and experimenting with bits of kit, we hope that we can keep making content that surprises people. International fame and a shitload of cash would also be nice too ... and would anyone like to fund us to make that Spice Girls feature doc?

Any Instagram, Twitter or websites where your future fans can stalk you?
@thisisdas

Rubina & Charlie

Rubina & Charlie

To see the short that cannot be unseen you’ll have to get your tickets HERE and then pop down to Streatham Space Project 9th July at 19.30. Charlie and Rubina will both be there for Q&A and the after chit-chat.