screening

Short Straw

Short films tend to surprise us with a nice twist at the end. Some do it good, some do it better. And some make us think ‘hmm, there might actually be a feature film somewhere in there…’

Ricky J Payne is as South Londoner as one can get. Born and bred in Brixton he is a perfect example of a healthy ‘let’s make some films!’ filmmaker. Here’s how he answered our questions.

There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
Lets play to find the story, and when we have found it, be unrelenting in its detail.

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
Seeing the story come to life;  taking a shape through the love and craft of the cast and crew. Seeing it, sat down beside audiences (especially when they don't know me). Seeing their reactions whatever they are. (Though it made me tear up when the audience in L.A. laughed at my comedy RIGHTSWIPE.  Seeing an audience understand what you're are conveying, is one of the best feelings ever). Then after that, is the understanding what worked and what didn't.Then taking that and pushing my love and craft in story telling further. 

Why this film?
Opportunity combined with pre production planning on a larger project called SEED. 'Short' Version, a test a film for that larger project which has now it's own bigger story which we plan to do separate from SEED.  I was filming with Director of Photography Diogo Atadini and Producer Victor Rios on another shoot, and then after, we were dropping off the equipment at Diogo's old studio.  I was inspired by the industrial elevator leading to it. I said to Victor, "We need to use this before Diogo moves out!" 
So I went away, sat down , thought about the elevator and the type of characters or situations it could give me and at the same time, I remember discussing about mobile film festivals and competitions. Opportunity to kill two birds with one stone.  1. Get my feet back into making scifi which I love and 2, test myself and the others who would join me, on using a mobile phone as the camera. After lots of Jammy Dodgers and Tea and great work from the cast and crew, Short Straw was born. 

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want...
One of my dream projects is an anthology scifi stories in the vein of  X-Files / The Expanse / Night Flyers , Men in Black and Cloverfield.  Using not just narrative, but also dance, music, paint, stop motion and practical effects. Practical Effects is a major thing or next step for me. I want to do a scifi film with majority of effects in camera, and three of the first major projects in that anthology has been drafted, however, funding is required to make them work. 

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
I have five immediate goals  which are scheduled throughout this year. SEED, STALKER,  Faye Ray VMA Dance Season 2, SNAKES (Working Title) and RIGHTSWIPE. SEED is one of the official scifi stories of the anthology mentioned above. SEED requires a built set , a studio to film in and moments of stop motion. I don't want to do it run and gun, that  wouldn't work for the vision I have for it.  Where SHORTSTRAW shows what we can do run and gun,  SEED's purpose is a next step to show what I can do with modest funding on a 'scifi' short film within a studio format, and give an idea of the the production value / style I want to achieve for the rest of the  scifi stories that will follow that.  STALKER I cannot discuss at the moment, however more news will follow once we begin festival submissions next month .  Faye Ray VMA Season 2 is a series of dance videos in collaboration with Faye Reader, who is dancer, choreographer and poet. Our first season ,  A Time to Play, which is really us getting to know each other in reccee sessions is out now on Vimeo, Youtube and Instagram.  Snakes (Working Title) is a Cyber Punk short film I'm developing and will be working with actor / fellow filmmaker Billie Vee. Rightswipe is a non-romantic comedy of the challenges with online dating, and shows my love for directing awkward / dark comedy.  Currently touring Festivals, and thanks to an amazing cast & crew,  has achieved Best International Film LA Short Film Festival and Best Comedy at London Independent Awards. I want to expand on it with Writers and Producers Max Warrick and Carina Birrell and we're currently in talks to do so. Scifi , Fantasy and Arkward / Dark Comedy is my love and direction for the next 10 years.

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So come on down to Streatham Space Project this Tuesday, 14.5. at 19.30 and watch Short Straw among five other shorts and have a chat with Ricky!
Tickets here!

Where is Europe?

The last few years have been very strongly marked by migrating crisis all over the world. Some resulting in dividing countries, some in people’s lives being lost.
Where is Europe went on board a rescue vessel that was right in the middle of it all.

Valentina Signorelli, the director, answered the CineShots questionnaire.

There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
Valentina Signorelli (PhD Film) is a professional writer and producer based in London, UK. In 2016 she co-founded Daitona production in Italy, recently awarded as the most innovative young production company of the country. 

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
The idea that what you first had in mind can potentially reach millions of people and make a positive impact on their lives. 

Why this film?
This film is set on board the NGO migrant rescue vessel Aquarius, the same kept stuck at sea in 2018 for over a week and with 629 refugees onboard. Where is Europe? explores one of the most tragic humanitarian crisis through the eyes of the humanitarian operators in their everyday life on board the rescue vessel.

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want...
I would love to produce a series out of this short exploring who are the people of Europe today and what is the impact of the EU on their everyday life. Each episode would follow the life of a group of Europeans living in a strategical, geographical, political or cultural area in the hope to promote awareness and call for cooperation. 

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
With another couple of colleagues, I run a small production company based in Italy, Daitona. In the near future, I would like to expand our network and co-produce other projects with new partners around the world.

Valentina Signorelli

Valentina Signorelli

The amazing short Where is Europe will be screened 145.2019 at Streatham Space Project.
Click for tickets.

Two Aliens

Two people, a weapon of mass distruction, one room, eleven minutes.
Both in power, each with their own agenda. Doesn’t really get any better than that, does it?

Written and directed by Liam Pinheiro-Rogers who’s been making film since he was 13. And, boy, are his skills on display.

Liam Pinheiro-Rogers

Liam Pinheiro-Rogers

As everyone Liam also got served a fistful of our questions. Here it goes:

There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
A young 23 year old filmmaker from London who specialises in genre specific films, mostly in the horror and fantasy genres, with surrealism added in.

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
The passion and the adventure. I love making stories, creating characters and especially my own world. 

Why this film?
This film is topical when it comes to the military industrial complex and it best showcases my style in terms of dialogue.

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want...
I would make an alien invasion film with a twist. I would have Tom Hardy, Viggo Mortensen, Mary Elizabeth Winstead etc.

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
I want to be a writer and director of various genre-related films (horror and fantasy are at the top).

And if you’re still not convinced join us 16.4. at the Streatham Space Project, watch all the films and have a chat with Liam (and us) afterwards.

Tickets sold now and HERE.

Bella's Requiem

Rarely do we get films made by filmmakers who have only been on this Earth for 15 years (or less). And even rearer is the case when a film made by young filmmakers has the level of quality that ‘Bella’s Requiem’ does.

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We’ve talked to Joel Black - one of the young creators - so without further ado enjoy the interview.

There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
“South London teen filmmakers take on the big boys”

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work, filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
The end result of all hard work and progress made throughout the journey. The learning process from start to finish, and the ability to understand and appreciate how films are produced gives us an enjoyment that you cannot find elsewhere.

Why this film?
We wrote this film when we were 13 years old and filmed when we were 14, we are now 15 and keen to show the world what we are capable of. We have grown with this story and become very attached to our characters. A group of young boys, coming of age and the conspiracy surrounding an unresolved mystery along with an intricate narrative mixed with crushing betrayal make this, our debut film a must see in our opinion.

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want...
Idris Elba, because he can carry a strong antagonist role - Rosamund Pike, because she can appreciate a very serious role and Alex Lawther, since he is perfect for the thriller genre, one of our favourite genres to create.

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
As young filmmakers we want to be taken seriously and for our work to be respected. We want to make films that intelligently challenge viewers and also entertain. We are keen to make partnerships with older more experienced filmmakers and industry professionals from whom we can learn and develop.

Join us 16.4. at 19.30 (tickets right HERE) and watch their film, meet them at the Q&A and have a chat afterwards.
But for now enjoy the trailer!

Rituals For Change

Did you know witchcraft is still a thing?
And did you also know it can actually be a good thing?
Whatever your answers to the questions above “Rituals for Change”, creatied by Leanne Davies, is a beautiful experimental short documentary meditating on that idea.

Leanne Davis

Leanne Davis

We shot our regular set of qeustions at Leanne just to get her know a bit better.

CineShots: There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?

Leanne Davis: Oh I honestly have no idea. I'm still figuring out who I am as a filmmaker so I think other people are probably better placed to answer that than me at the moment! 'A work in progress' maybe?

CS: When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?

LD: I ask myself this a lot! I don't know, I just feel compelled to do it! One of my friends who is an incredible filmmaker likened the process to birthing a child - it's this irrational compulsion to create something and something happens to block out how traumatic the actual delivery is! It's frustrating but also exciting because you never really know how it's going to turn out, to a level which I think it's unique to film.

CS: Why this film?

LD: I've always been really drawn to witchcraft and the occult, and so it was a great excuse for me to explore my interest in it. But I was also fascinated by the recent resurgence of interest in it and what it meant politically, and what happens to the archetype of the witch when it becomes commodified and assimilated into the same system to which it is the antithesis. I was also curious about how to represent such practices in the medium of film. I still haven't quite figured that out!

CS: You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want...

LD: Well I don't tend to work with actors so I would probably spend the budget on music and locations! I would love to travel around the world and meet different communities of witches!

CS: What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?

LD: I would love to collaborate more as it's just been a one man band job so far. I'd love to work with other filmmakers and artists from other disciplines, especially sound artists, and get a proper budget so I can hire a producer! I'd also really like to experiment with different mediums, particularly 16mm.

Her film will be screened 16.4. at our 3rd CineShots, followed by a Q&A and a chance to have a chat with her and everyone else.

Be there or be somehwere else.

2:40 to London

It’s surreal, has a sneaky plot, a lot of lumbersexual and chilli with a secret ingredient!

It’s also an award-winning short film made by an award-winning director (and that’s a lot of awards won in a sentence!)
Meet Gavin, a Northern-Irish writer/director based in London. He’s studied film in Wales, was also a photographer, artist and a musician. An all-around guy one could say.

Gavin Irvine

Gavin Irvine

We’ve dared to ask Irvine a couple of questions just so you get to know him better before watching his film and chatting with him live.

CineShots: There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?

Gavin Irvine: The newspaper: Practical Pigs
Headline: Dependably fresh. Dependably delicious. Cookstown Sausages are the best!

CS: When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?

GI: Being tied to the whipping post.

CS: Why this film?

GI: Because I missed the 1:40 to London.

CS: You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want...

GI: I'd have a time machine built and nip back to collect Betty Davis, Charles Laughton, Peter Sellers, Oliver Reed and Marlon Brando.

CS: What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?

GI: Not to miss the 2:40 to London again, not to be tied to the whipping post again, hope that my Cookstown Sausages are always dependably fresh and dependably delicious, and that someone builds me a time machine soon

Gavin’s film 2:40 to London will be screened at CineShots 16.4.2019. Enjoy the trailer below!

'When Saturn Returns' on CineShots 2.0

There’s all kinds of love stories and all kinds of ways to tell them.
When Saturn Returns picked a certain kind of love story we haven’t really seen on screen yet. With a witty script, masterful camera and amazing locations this short is a pleasant dessert.
Mihai Bruma - the Moldovian creator of this gem - is defenitely one to look out for.

Enjoy the trailer and make sure you get your tickets - https://bit.ly/2BPK39w

CineShots v1.0 - Success!

The very first CineShots had everything a successful birth has - nurveousness, heavy breathing, observes, seven short films, Q&A, laughther, tears, drinks, chit-chat and the world’s most beautiful baby (and the world’s proudest parents)!

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We couldn’t be happier with the short films people have sent our way to screen them.
Quite a few filmmakers in the audience lead to some serious film talk insightful Q&A which later on turned into pints and a rather cheerful networking event.

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What surprised me the most was the feedback from the guests as everyone seemed to be craving for an event like this. Meaning CineShots is bound to have a long journey ahead.
See you next month!