cinema

Bath

Can one word ruin a holiday? Can it ruin a relationship? Or can it build one?
So little words, so many questions!

Bath is written and directed by Meredith Dobbs whom we are more than delighted to host for the second time at CineShots. And she never manages to let us down. Meredith, take it away.

There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
Maybe an interview about a film I've made? But an advertisement? I don't know what it would be for.

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
I just genuinely love working with actors and a team of filmmakers. If I'm going to anything worthwhile worth my time, it will always be this.

Why this film?
I wanted to tell a story about invisible queerness and how hard it can be to stand up and say, "I want this invisible thing to be seen." I was trying to work out how a loving partner could be the antagonist that, to create the central conflict in my film, and I thought about how politics can affect our intimate relationships negatively. So invisible queerness and politics in relationships became the central themes, and I think both are quite topical and relatable.

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want...
Casting would depend on the project, but I'd definitely want to work with actors I get along with really well. I think that's especially important for improv, because the method requires the director and actor to ask a lot of each other. As for the unlimited budget, I'd use it to make sure everyone on set was paid fairly, had reasonable working hours, childcare on set, long enough breaks between shifts, etc. And after that we can talk about crane shots and expensive GFX.

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
I want to write and direct narrative features. And probably edit them, too. I'd also like to edit features directed by others because I do really love editing.

Meredith Dobbs

Meredith Dobbs

We won’t tell you much about the film but let’s just say there’a a lot at stake here. And you’ll just have to pop down to the ol’ Streatham Space Project on 11.6. at 19.30 to see how it all unrolls.
Tickets right HERE.

"Have You Seen Buster?"

If CineShots was a Scooby Doo cartoon Emmanuel Li and his gang would be a bunch of meddling kids and we, the old guys, would always be angry at them for showing everyone we’re just a bunch of pretenders.
And that’s because the guys behind The Big Tent Films know their ropes pretty well.

We interogated Emmanuel Lie - writer and director of Have You Seen Buster? - in a haunted castle right after his Mistery Machine van broke down.

There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
It'd be a very unflattering photo of me followed by "MISSING: Have You Seen Emmanuel Li? Last Seen in the Walthamstow Marshes."

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
Film is such a unique and fantastic art form in its accessibility and ability to appeal to absolutely everyone. I've always had a passion for stories and to be able to have the creative control and freedom to bring a story to life from script to screen is intensely rewarding. The process is, of course, arduous and often frustrating, be it writer's block or on-set complications, but filmmaking being the ultimate team sport, working with so many talented people, sharing in these ups and downs, solving problems together, all while striving to tell a great story will never cease to spark joy in me. And hopefully, when all is said and done, it will spark joy in the audience as well.

Why this film?
Having just come off making a bleak, gritty drama last summer, with many more dark comedies in the works, I wanted to take a departure and make something sweet and charming without any cynicism. I love dogs but have never had one, so part of the "searching-for-a-dog" plot came from that. The location also played a big part - exploring Walthamstow Village made me think of all the wacky characters that could inhabit such a colourful, vibrant world, a world I desperately wanted to share with audiences. Being a magician, I love twists and I won't spoil it here, but the ending came from something that happened that was really close to me, which was the main inspiration for the film.

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want...
Wow, what an opportunity! I'd make a darkly comedic Neo-Western crime caper - think Reservoir Dogs with a Coen Brothers twist. It'd be set in harsh, urban LA and then transition to the gorgeous, sunswept backdrop of the Mojave Desert and hell, the Grand Canyon while we're at it! It'd follow a ragtag bunch of criminals who made off with the wrong suitcase containing something seemingly worthless but are now hunted by rival gangs, a corrupt detective with a crossbow, and a female assassin whose preferred method of transport is horseback. It'd star Taron Egerton, Daniel Kaluuya, Dean Norris, Timothee Chalamet, Joaquin Phoenix, and Charlize Theron. It's a crazy, chaotic wild ride and maybe even a bit messy and trashy, but among the madness, I'd love to explore what drives people to commit crime and the complex disparity between generations through the father-sons relationship of the main group.

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
My dream would be to continue doing what I love - filmmaking and storytelling - for the rest of my life and be lucky enough to make a living out of it. There's nothing quite like the collective sharing of a story through film, and to be able to provide that experience and create art that makes the drudgery of life that much more bearable would be an honour.

Emmanuel Li

Emmanuel Li

To see if anyone’s seen Buster you’ll have to pop to Streatham Space Project 11.6. at 19.30 and watch the film with five other amazing shorts. Emmanuel will also be there for Q&A and your regular autographs.
Make sure you get your TICKETS.

RUCK IT!

What starts out like a sports commercials, gets you to tears three minutes later and ends up making you feel all warm and hopeful?

RuckItPoster.jpg

Ruck it is one of those films one simply can’t and shouldn’t ignore. On the top of it being very well made.
Kelvin DeSena, the director, answered our series of questions.

There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
‘’If he can make films. Anyone can! Look at that melonhead!’’

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work, filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
I’m no tortured artist nor do I see filmmaking as special. Yes it’s hard, but so is anything worth doing. I think we should spend less time talking about how hard it is and more time talking about how easy it is. Filmmaking has never been so accessible. More people should be doing it! It’s so much fun!

Why this film?
Honest answer is, I was approached to make it by a guy at Mencap. He had been to a private screening of a short documentary telling the story of a swimming club called Swim Dem Crew. He wanted to do something similar as they have some incredible stories to tell and we were lucky enough to be approached to make it! I thought it was an amazing opportunity and threw myself into it. Plus, I'm a big rugby fan as well!

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want…
I would make an awful big budget film. It would probably have giant laser beams in the sky with Arnold Schwarzenegger lifting large heavy objects whilst delivering terrible one liners...actually that sounds pretty cool!!!
I think I would use the money to make five low budget films, casting new and exciting actors that can add a new voice. Would also be nice to have Riz Ahmed on board as well. I would love to see British Asians represented more in film as I think we have something to contribute.  

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
To make more and to get better, whilst making new friends and having a laugh, and if I can continue to pay my rent as well, then that would be a bonus.

Kelvin DeSena

Kelvin DeSena

Ruck it! will be screened on our May CineShots and we will have Kelvin DeSena there to talk to so get your questions ready, get your tickets here and we’ll see you Tuesday, 14.5. at 19.30!

Where is Europe?

The last few years have been very strongly marked by migrating crisis all over the world. Some resulting in dividing countries, some in people’s lives being lost.
Where is Europe went on board a rescue vessel that was right in the middle of it all.

Valentina Signorelli, the director, answered the CineShots questionnaire.

There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
Valentina Signorelli (PhD Film) is a professional writer and producer based in London, UK. In 2016 she co-founded Daitona production in Italy, recently awarded as the most innovative young production company of the country. 

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
The idea that what you first had in mind can potentially reach millions of people and make a positive impact on their lives. 

Why this film?
This film is set on board the NGO migrant rescue vessel Aquarius, the same kept stuck at sea in 2018 for over a week and with 629 refugees onboard. Where is Europe? explores one of the most tragic humanitarian crisis through the eyes of the humanitarian operators in their everyday life on board the rescue vessel.

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want...
I would love to produce a series out of this short exploring who are the people of Europe today and what is the impact of the EU on their everyday life. Each episode would follow the life of a group of Europeans living in a strategical, geographical, political or cultural area in the hope to promote awareness and call for cooperation. 

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
With another couple of colleagues, I run a small production company based in Italy, Daitona. In the near future, I would like to expand our network and co-produce other projects with new partners around the world.

Valentina Signorelli

Valentina Signorelli

The amazing short Where is Europe will be screened 145.2019 at Streatham Space Project.
Click for tickets.

Jo and Jade

Teenage love is a serious thing.
Seriously.
Especially if told through an amazing story directed by an even more amazing teenage director (we demand an ID as we don’t really believe he’s that young) Ethan Ross.

We’ve had a quick e-chat with Ethan and threw our usual set of questions at him. Here’s what we got back:

There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
I think were it a photo of me, it'd be something like “A young director from north london making waves in indie film community" or something like that - nothing too show-offy!
Were it for Jo and Jade (the short film), it'd be "fresh and subversive lgbt romcom makes a splash, despite its young team". I'd be  much keener to promote the film than myself!

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
Although it's a difficult process, I really couldn't stand not creating - it's like my sustenance, and at this point I find it boring to relax... I prefer to be working on a script, or fine tuning some cutting! I absolutely love the feeling of having made something I really feel is my own, that I'm proud of, and that I'm happy to show to people. Along with the camaraderie of the shoot, that feeling really makes it worth it.

Why this film?
In terms of modern cinema, i feel the simple teen movie is a bit underrepresented in the mainstream, as opposed to the 80s where you had people like John Hughes making those amazing films we all love. I wanted to make something honest, in the way it presented characters and situations, and in the way that, well, those classic films tend to have very idealistic happy endings, and I felt that wasn't really very truthful to actual teenage life.

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want...
I'd really love to make a musical, so probably that - but definitely set in London, I feel like there aren't enough musicals properly set here. I'd want to cast Saoirse Ronan and John Goodman because they're both amazing and would have pretty great chemistry. I'm tearing up just at the idea.

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
Ultimately, I'd like to make films full-time, with nothing else on the side, preferably as a director, but if not, probably as an editor. In the shorter term, I'd like to get my work into some festivals where people can really see my work, but that's not the most important thing. The dream for me is just to improve as much as possible, and to make something I'm unfalteringly proud of. That'd be great.

Ethan Ross

Ethan Ross

Jo and Jade will be screened at May’s CineShots on 14.5.2019.
Tickets available HERE and don’t forget to bring everyone you know.

Two Aliens

Two people, a weapon of mass distruction, one room, eleven minutes.
Both in power, each with their own agenda. Doesn’t really get any better than that, does it?

Written and directed by Liam Pinheiro-Rogers who’s been making film since he was 13. And, boy, are his skills on display.

Liam Pinheiro-Rogers

Liam Pinheiro-Rogers

As everyone Liam also got served a fistful of our questions. Here it goes:

There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
A young 23 year old filmmaker from London who specialises in genre specific films, mostly in the horror and fantasy genres, with surrealism added in.

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
The passion and the adventure. I love making stories, creating characters and especially my own world. 

Why this film?
This film is topical when it comes to the military industrial complex and it best showcases my style in terms of dialogue.

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want...
I would make an alien invasion film with a twist. I would have Tom Hardy, Viggo Mortensen, Mary Elizabeth Winstead etc.

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
I want to be a writer and director of various genre-related films (horror and fantasy are at the top).

And if you’re still not convinced join us 16.4. at the Streatham Space Project, watch all the films and have a chat with Liam (and us) afterwards.

Tickets sold now and HERE.

Bella's Requiem

Rarely do we get films made by filmmakers who have only been on this Earth for 15 years (or less). And even rearer is the case when a film made by young filmmakers has the level of quality that ‘Bella’s Requiem’ does.

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We’ve talked to Joel Black - one of the young creators - so without further ado enjoy the interview.

There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?
“South London teen filmmakers take on the big boys”

When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work, filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?
The end result of all hard work and progress made throughout the journey. The learning process from start to finish, and the ability to understand and appreciate how films are produced gives us an enjoyment that you cannot find elsewhere.

Why this film?
We wrote this film when we were 13 years old and filmed when we were 14, we are now 15 and keen to show the world what we are capable of. We have grown with this story and become very attached to our characters. A group of young boys, coming of age and the conspiracy surrounding an unresolved mystery along with an intricate narrative mixed with crushing betrayal make this, our debut film a must see in our opinion.

You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want...
Idris Elba, because he can carry a strong antagonist role - Rosamund Pike, because she can appreciate a very serious role and Alex Lawther, since he is perfect for the thriller genre, one of our favourite genres to create.

What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?
As young filmmakers we want to be taken seriously and for our work to be respected. We want to make films that intelligently challenge viewers and also entertain. We are keen to make partnerships with older more experienced filmmakers and industry professionals from whom we can learn and develop.

Join us 16.4. at 19.30 (tickets right HERE) and watch their film, meet them at the Q&A and have a chat afterwards.
But for now enjoy the trailer!

2:40 to London

It’s surreal, has a sneaky plot, a lot of lumbersexual and chilli with a secret ingredient!

It’s also an award-winning short film made by an award-winning director (and that’s a lot of awards won in a sentence!)
Meet Gavin, a Northern-Irish writer/director based in London. He’s studied film in Wales, was also a photographer, artist and a musician. An all-around guy one could say.

Gavin Irvine

Gavin Irvine

We’ve dared to ask Irvine a couple of questions just so you get to know him better before watching his film and chatting with him live.

CineShots: There is an ad in a newspaper with your photo in it. What does it say?

Gavin Irvine: The newspaper: Practical Pigs
Headline: Dependably fresh. Dependably delicious. Cookstown Sausages are the best!

CS: When it comes to complexity and difficulty of producing an art work filmmaking is very close to the top. What makes the whole journey, often unpleasant, worthwhile for you?

GI: Being tied to the whipping post.

CS: Why this film?

GI: Because I missed the 1:40 to London.

CS: You have unlimited budget, green light for your dream project and can cast anyone you want...

GI: I'd have a time machine built and nip back to collect Betty Davis, Charles Laughton, Peter Sellers, Oliver Reed and Marlon Brando.

CS: What are your future goals regarding filmmaking?

GI: Not to miss the 2:40 to London again, not to be tied to the whipping post again, hope that my Cookstown Sausages are always dependably fresh and dependably delicious, and that someone builds me a time machine soon

Gavin’s film 2:40 to London will be screened at CineShots 16.4.2019. Enjoy the trailer below!